20 Pregnant Animals Who Just Want the Baby Out Of Them Already

Baby bumps are one thing, but these mothers of the animal kingdom have reached epic proportions while waiting for their little munchkins to arrive. Even if you can’t relate to their pregnancy, it’s hard not to be entertained by their grumpy little faces.

20. Georgia the Goat

Don’t let the beard fool you; this isn’t a billy that let himself go. She’s a nanny goat called Georgia, and she was expecting kids. Despite her gruff demeanor, though, Georgia received the Andy Warhol treatment with a series of enhanced images shown on the Huffington Post.

19. Japanese Macaque

This Japanese macaque may look too pregnant to move, but at least she’s using her time productively. Flickr’s GeekAaron captured this monkey momma boning up on her parenting skills in April 2011, with a “Zoo babies” pamphlet.

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18. Monk Seal

Female monk seals mature at around four years old and usually give birth to one calf a year, and the species is highly endangered so every baby calf is precious. Kanaka Menehune on Flickr photographed this mama monk seal on the beach in Hawaii, so it’s not all bad.

17. Georgia the American Bulldog

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If there’s one face in the animal kingdom that can accurately portray the feels of a heavy pregnancy, it’s a bulldog. Don’t worry Georgia, it’ll all be over soon – American bulldog pregnancies usually have their litter in about 62 days, with an average of 11 adorable puppies.

16. Sphynx Cat

Now that is a maternity mood swing! No, it’s not an enraged alien brood mother – this is a hairless sphynx cat and, at her size, she’s entitled to be a little angry. Pregnancy in cats average around 65 days (though she looks like she’s been knocked up for years).

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15. Ferret

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Now you know where the expression “pop goes the weasel” comes from. Fortunately for this ferret, her species only stays pregnant for six weeks. Their litter numbers average around eight fuzzy kits per birth, but it can be as few as one or as many as 18.

14. Guinea Pig

So that’s where Pokémon eggs come from! This fuzzy beach ball is a very pregnant guinea pig. Gestation periods for these rodents can be anywhere from 59 to 72 days, and they average three pups. This one, though, had five pups two days after the picture was taken.

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13. Harbor Seal

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She may be too pregnant to move, but don’t worry – she only has to wait for the tide to come in, and it doesn’t look like she minds the wait. This harbor seal, caught sunning her baby bump in Alsea Bay, Oregon, could be pregnant for as long as 11 months. Eesh.

12. Zebra

If you think this mother zebra’s baby bulge is large now, you can imagine how big she’d look without those slimming vertical stripes. On average, her species usually has a single foal – fully-striped and fluffily-maned – after a pregnancy that can last up to 12 months.

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11. Giraffe

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When you’ve got a bun in the oven, all concerns about standing in a lady-like manner go out the window. If you think humans have it bad when they’re pregnant, though, spare a thought for poor giraffes – they can stay with calf for up to 460 days.

10. Merino Sheep

Would ewe believe the size of this mother-to-be? She’s entitled to be a little sheepish, especially when it looks like her lambs are ready to kick their way out at any second. This massive momma was taken by Getty Image’s Sean Gallup in Gross Kreutz, Germany.

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9. Shetland Pony

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She may be a miniature horse but the next person to make a “why the long face” joke is going to be on the receiving end of a monster-sized maternity rage. Shetland ponies have an average pregnancy period of 326 days with their foal.

8. Pig

Looks like this portly piggy is close to having some little bacon wraps of her very own! Pigs generally have a 114-day pregnancy period and average 10 piglets a litter. And you thought humans had their hands full.

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7. Frog

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Is she naturally green, or is it morning sickness? Okay, technically frogs don’t get pregnant like mammals, but they do carry their eggs around inside them for a while. And when you consider that they can carry up to 20,000 eggs at a time, a little bloating might be expected.

6. Daisy the Hippo

One good thing about a hippo’s skin is that when they’ve been knocked up, the stretch marks don’t show. Daisy here, pictured right, may only have been pregnant for eight months, but hippos have calves that are about 10-times the size of a human baby. It could be worse, future mothers!

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5. Seahorse

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Don’t worry ladies, there are males out there who feel your pregnancy pains! In a turn of events, female seahorses insert their eggs into the males, the baby-bearers of their species. The males pop out as many as 100 to 1,000 bouncing babies on average… then they’re ready for another round of the baby dance!

4. Fox Squirrel

You’d need to have a death wish to come between this pregnant fox squirrel and her snacks. Flickr’s Catherine Mullhaupt affectionately gave this large lady the nickname “Big Momma,” though she was seen weeks later looking less “big” and more “momma” with her three young bushy-tailed pups.

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3. Gorilla

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Flickr’s Alyse and Remi got a picture of this amazing ape eating for two in 2012. At least, that’s the assumption; we wouldn’t want to risk angering an overweight gorilla by asking her when the baby’s due.

2. Sheep

We’re guessing Mark Robinson on Flickr had to use a wide lens to catch the bulk of this beauty wandering around with a belly full of fluff balls. Ewes have one to three lambs on average, and it looks like this one’s fully loaded.

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1. Pig

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This pig’s expression may be familiar to anyone who’s spent much time with a pregnant woman nearing her due date. It’s usually accompanied by the words: JUST. GET. IT. OUT. OF. ME.

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